"'Twas my intention, upon leaving mine house this eve, to engage in revelry and merriment, but I now, to speak true, feel at this moment as though I am under siege."

- Mercutio, Romeo and Juliet

I came out here to have a good time, and I’m honestly feeling so attacked right now.

(via cantankerousquince)

(Source: shesnoshakespeare, via moniquill)

e-brat:

iggy azalea - fancy cover (dont laugh please it took a lot of courage to post this)

(via booooost)

White People in July VS White People in October

bruj0sdelayer:

image

image

(via reverseracism)

When almstsmpl asks me to cook dinner. 

(Source: studioghifli, via meowazaki)

kateoplis:

If the newest, last stretch of the High Line doesn’t make you fall in love with New York all over again, I really don’t know what to say. Phase 3 of the elevated park, which opens on Sunday, is a heartbreaker, swinging west on 30th Street from 10th Avenue toward the Hudson River, straight into drop-dead sunset views. It spills into a feral grove of big-tooth aspen trees on 34th Street.

It’s hard to believe now that some New Yorkers once thought renovating the decrepit elevated rail line was a lousy idea. Not since Central Park opened in 1857 has a park reshaped New Yorkers’ thinking about public space and the city more profoundly. Like Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim museum in Spain, it has spread a dream, albeit largely a pipe dream, around the world: how one exceptional design — in this case, a work of landscape architecture — might miraculously alter a whole neighborhood, even a whole city’s fortunes.

Yes, at roughly $35 million, Phase 3, like the rest of the High Line, cost more per acre than probably any park in human history. With most city parks struggling to make ends meet, that kind of money is an inevitable source of resentment, notwithstanding that the High Line was, in significant measure, constructed and is almost exclusively maintained with private funds.”

But this third phase completes a kind of narrative, which the two earlier phases started, about 21st-century New York as a greener, sleeker metropolis, riven by wealth, with an anxious eye in the rearview mirror. It is a Rorschach test, signifying different things — about urban renewal, industry, gentrification, the environment — to different people. Occupying an in-between sort of space between buildings, neighborhoods, street and sky, the park makes a convenient receptacle for meaning. Neither an authentic ruin nor entirely built from scratch, a sign of runaway capital but also common ground, it is a modern landmark capitalizing on the romance of a bygone New York — the “real,” gritty city — a park born of the very forces that swept that city away.”

Photos: NG

(via obscurityfound)

blunthought:

"If I love you, I have to make you conscious of the things you don’t see."

| James Baldwin

(via therequiemforfireflies)

The Daily Show springs tense showdown with Native Americans on Redskins fans

racebending:

The Redskins Nation citizens eagerly signed up, most of them knowing that they might be mocked in their interview with correspondent Jason Jones. But several hours into the Sept. 13 taping of the yet-to-air episode, the fans, all from Virginia, said they were suddenly confronted by a larger group of Native American activists — all of whom were in on the showdown prearranged by “The Daily Show.”

The encounter at a Dupont Circle hotel was so tense that an Alexandria fan said she left in tears and felt so threatened that she later called the police. She has told “The Daily Show” to leave her out of the segment but doesn’t know whether the producers will comply.

“This goes way beyond mocking. Poking fun is one thing, but that’s not what happened,” said Kelli O’Dell, 56, a former teacher who lives in Alexandria and doesn’t watch the show regularly. “It was disingenuous. The Native Americans accused me of things that were so wrong. I felt in danger. I didn’t consent to that. I am going to be defamed.”

If only the Native American activists protesting the racist R**** mascot knew what it was like to be falsely misrepresented and endangered without their consent, and defamed. They’d want to call the police, too.

In her essay "I’m Leaving!" White fragility in Racial Dialogues, Robin J. DiAngelo writes: ”fragility coupled with privilege will result in a response of resistance, indulgence in emotional incapacitation, exiting, or a combination of these.”

And they say people protesting the R**** mascot are the ones who are “too sensitive.”

(via the-treble)

red3blog:

* Men who don’t respect consent don’t have a special right to keep that private.

* Men who threaten violence against women don’t have a special right to keep that private.

* Men who disregard a woman’s sexual agency to objectify her don’t have a special right to keep that private.

* Men who abuse women don’t have a special right to keep that private.

(via ceciliadavidson)

black—lamb:

unityy:

litsy-kalyptica:

zubat:

Contrary to popular belief, marginalized groups actually don’t owe allies anything and aren’t obligated to praise allies just for showing basic human decency.

No but marginalized groups can’t treat allies like shit either

Yea we know, otherwise you’ll literally kill us

!!!

If your allyship is dependent on how YOU are treated, you are a shitty ally.

(Source: zubat)